Commiting a code change, when the inspection fails , is perfectly fine as the code logic is working fine anyway

DWQA QuestionsCategory: Continuous IntegrationCommiting a code change, when the inspection fails , is perfectly fine as the code logic is working fine anyway
Editor Staff asked 10 months ago

Commiting a code change, when the inspection fails , is perfectly fine as the code logic is working fine anyway
(a)False
(b)True
 
Continuous integration is a DevOps software development practice where developers regularly merge their code changes into a central repository, after which automated builds and tests are run. Continuous integration most often refers to the build or integration stage of the software release process and entails both an automation component (e.g. a CI or build service) and a cultural component (e.g. learning to integrate frequently).
The key goals of continuous integration are to find and address bugs quicker, improve software quality, and reduce the time it takes to validate and release new software updates.
Continuous Integration is a software development practice where members of a team integrate their work frequently, usually each person integrates at least daily – leading to multiple integrations per day. Each integration is verified by an automated build (including test) to detect integration errors as quickly as possible.
Many teams find that this approach leads to significantly reduced integration problems and allows a team to develop cohesive software more rapidly. This article is a quick overview of Continuous Integration summarizing the technique and its current usage.
developers on a team might work in isolation for an extended period of time and only merge their changes to the master branch once their work was completed. This made merging code changes difficult and time-consuming, and also resulted in bugs accumulating for a long time without correction. These factors made it harder to deliver updates to customers quickly.
CI is built on other software development best practices including automated testing, version control, build automation, and automated deployments. Each one of these pillars of continuous integration has its own ecosystem of tools and philosophies.
Continuous Integration Questions and Answers of 2021

1 Answers
Editor Staff answered 10 months ago

(a)False
Committing a code change, when the inspection fails, is perfectly fine as the code logic is working fine anyway is True. … Hence committing the code change when the inspection fails does not have any impact. And many software services go for code review when new codes are added